Jumbo Hotel

Introduction

The Jumbo Hostel at Arlanda Airport near Stockholm, Sweden, is a hostel located inside a decommissioned 747-200 jetliner. The aircraft is a Boeing 747-212B originally built for Singapore Airlines in 1976, registered 9V-SQE (construction number 21162/line number 283). It was later sold to Pan American where it was registered N727PA and named "Clipper Belle of the Sky". The aircraft later served with Air Club International, Transjet, Northeast Airlines, Jet Midwest Inc, Tower Air, Nationair, Cathay Pacific, and Garuda Indonesia. The last owner was Transjet which had Arlanda as base, but it went bankrupt in 2002. The plane has been at Arlanda since then.

Exterior view of the Jumbo Hotel

In December 2007, Sigtuna authorities granted a building permit for establishing Jumbo Hostel at the entrance to Arlanda airport. In January 2008, the aircraft was moved to a construction parking site where the first phase of the conversion began with the dismantling of the old interior, new paint and new decorations for the rooms. 450 seats were taken out and the plane was sanitized completely. The hostel was built like any building, subjected to the same demands on climate control and insulation, adhering to all common energy standards. Heating is achieved with an air-air inverter.

During the summer of 2008, the plane was towed to its final destination at the entrance to Stockholm-Arlanda Airport where it was placed on a concrete foundation with the landing gear secured in two steel cradles. The hostel opened late December 2008.


Architecture

To build the hotel and accommodate all the beds, the Boeing 747 was stripped down to its shell. All the seats were removed and the plane was sanitized completely. The hostel was built like any building, subjected to the same demands on climate control and insulation, adhering to all common energy standards. A few elements of aviation were kept intact though, for instance, the signs next to sinks advising users to wipe down the surfaces for the next passenger and warning notices around emergency exit hatches. In the flight deck, the pilot's original controls, now inoperable, adds glamour to the cockpit suite.


Rooms

Cockpit suite

The Jumbo Hostel has 27 rooms with three beds in each and its more expensive "cockpit suite" located on the upper deck. Altogether the hostel holds 79 beds. All rooms have a flat screen television where guests can watch the times of departure for all flights.

Throughout the jetliner guests have access to wireless broadband. All rooms share a shower and toilet in the corridor, except for the cockpit suite and a single person room which features their own. The beds are great and the windows offer a fantastic view.

Restaurant

The café & bar

There's not true restauant, but only a café & bar where guests and non-guests are able to purchase breakfast, coffee, pastries and basic meals. The cafe provides microwaves for patrons to heat up meals they have brought with them. A bit disappointing, even if it's not the main goal of this hotel. We would have liked somethting a little bit more refined.

Recap

8/10
Pros
  • Astonishing view
  • Warm welcome
  • Quality beds
Cons
  • No real restaurant

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Location


Architect

Oscar Diös

Price

150$ - 500$ per night

Website

www.jumbostay.com